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What to Put on the Front of a Business Card

As an attorney recruiter, I have seen a variety of business cards slide across my desk.  Some have been good, some have been bad, and some have been downright ugly.  It seems trite, but your business card truly is your own personal form of marketing.  What you put on your business card should reflect your brand as an attorney candidate. 

The front of a business card is the first thing many people see when you introduce yourself.  Therefore, the front of your business card, along with your appearance, can make or break your chances for a job or to retain a client.  As a legal recruiter, I have heard law firms exclaim in surprise that they thought the business card did not inspire confidence in the candidate before them.  It is worth the effort to examine the front of your business card and determine the most important information to include as well as the placement of that information in the most eye-catching manner.

Having an effective business card means more than just printing your name and telephone number on the front.  Not only should you have certain information on your card, you should also include this information in way that immediately draws the eye to the important points and makes a statement about your professionalism and organizational skills.

Here are a few rules to follow when designing the front of your business card.

  • Do not cram.  It is tempting to put all of your information on the front of your card, but resist the temptation.  A “busy” card turns off prospective clients and employers with sensory overload.  Include only vital contact information; save the bios and other non-essentials for a resume or your web site. Legal candidates intent on impressing law firms can do so with their professional business card backed by a resume and portfolio which offer the pertinent details.

  • Do not use funky fonts.  Cute fonts are appropriate for bake sale posters, not a business card.  Use clear, legible fonts and add an interesting logo for art value.  Be sure the font is large enough to be read easily.

  • Leave some white space.  Many people jot notes on business cards, so leave a little white space to accommodate this habit.

  • Consider a “call to action.”  If you include any statement on your business card other than your contact information, make it short and sweet and make it a call to action.  A call to action suggests and action someone can take following their perusal of your information.  Think about how to work your call to action in a very short statement and include it at the bottom of the card.

  • Avoid too many colors.  While professionally-printed cards give you the option to include colors, avoid using more than two or three.  A little color adds interest; too much dazzles the eyes and causes confusion.  Keep all your printed information a single color in groups; for example, all your contact information should be one color while your call to action could be a second color and your logo a third.

When it comes to obtaining a lawyer job in California, your business card could be the first step in or out of the door. Rather than leaving it to chance, attorney candidates should give it the careful review it deserves.